Back to Articles | « Previous | Next »
Home » How new normals shift our perception of climate change

How new normals shift our perception of climate change

How new normals shift our perception of climate change

These articles are must-reads for understanding how the climate is changing and how it is normalized.

Anyone who has lived in the same place for a number of years is likely to casually – almost instinctively – compare their current weather to what they think of as usual, typical, or normal weather: “This winter has been much snowier than usual.” And we have all heard weather forecasters say things like “Temperatures over the next few days will be 5-8 degrees warmer than normal.”

What many of us don’t know is that for weather specialists, “normal” is a technical term: normal weather conditions, especially details of temperatures and precipitation, are those of the most recently concluded three-(whole)-decade period. In 2019, “normal” was 1981-2010; now, in 2021, it is 1991-2020.

This definition has long been useful and in some ways still is. But where it leads us now is also both illuminating (the climate of the US has changed dramatically, and with increasing speed) and problematic: What will it matter if we forget what our climates used to be like before our fossil fuels changed them? What if we unconsciously “normalize” our planet’s thoroughly disrupted and disruptive new conditions?

#globalwarming #climatechange #carboncompensation #bluesky #climateemergency #climatecrisis #blueskye #blueskyefoundation #compensate #greentechexchange #zerocarbon #climatenews #blueskyelife #elonmusk #billgates #greentech
Sticker